This Year Shall Be Great

I have been pondering this for a while now. To be precise, since I learned about Erik Brickarp’s Skill Development List and since I reviewed his CAST 2013 talk about self-education, the idea of my own  list has been gnawing at me. So I got myself together January 1 and drafted it in my notebook. Then I forgot about it for a while… now I remembered it. And decided to publish it (you know, social accountability and all that).

There you go: Skill Development List 2014.

It is what it is. It’s not about checking all items off. It’s about me following my energy and making myself happy when learning about new things. I’m so done with feeling miserable that I can’t go back 🙂

 

Some Notes from Copenhagen Context 2014

Copenhagen Context is a new conference held in… Copenhagen, obviously. The focus was on longer keynote-style talks, so the whole conference was comprised of 5 talks. However, some of them introduced practical exercises as well. I’d go so far as to say that such talks align with the spirit of the context-driven community, i.e. ideas you introduced should be applied in practice.

Overall, I think there was a good balance between philosophical, inspirational and practical talks covering different aspects of context-driven testing. I left feeling content and equipped with useful material. Thanks to Morten Hougaard (and Anette) who put such a great program together!

Michael Bolton took his time to get to the whisky part. I almost got thirsty. He talked about the principles of context-driven school and his preferred order. I agree with putting the third one (people, working together, are the most important part of any project’s context) to the first place because it goes well with my own observations.

He also talked about the paradox of CDT: instead of being context-driven we sometimes have to be context-driving as we need to change the context to persuade someone that there is no one true way. That’s when you’re not context-driven.

Though, when I think about it an tie it with my experience, I end up with something like “the context can drive me to become a driver, that is due to something in the context I decide it has to be changed”…

Carsten Feilberg encouraged us to use child labor for testing remember how we used to be natural explorers as children, and how heuristics help us comes up with test ideas. It was useful to be reminded to go meta yourself and recognize the heuristics you actually use. I guess that if I tried, I’d initially come up with fairly context-specific heuristics but I’d like to try and generalize them. Although I think there’s a fairly good chance I’ll just re-discover what others have put out there. It would be a good awareness exercise anyway.

Carsten didn’t really trust a room full of testers with his remote-controlled helicopter (the remote was out of our reach but we could gently touch the helicopter at least). But it was fun to think about test ideas for it. Funnily enough, my first couple of ideas were pretty much a perfect match to the mission of Carsten’s test session of the helicopter: finding out the range of the remote control and if the radio signal could get obstructed by objects, and if the helicopter could get lost (apparently, my hunch was right and Carsten did find a bug with that :)).

I missed out on Louise Perold‘s beer testing session at Let’s Test last year but I was in luck this time in Copenhagen. Many interesting conversations were sparked and cool ideas introduced as people were thinking of testing a bottle of beer. I really think it is an elegant example to use beer as the product to test because it’s versatile, informal, and pretty much everyone can relate to it in some way.

I really liked the idea of “talking to the function in your own words”. I tend to forget the power of paraphrasing from time to time but it is really powerful for clarifying my own thinking as well as detecting fuzziness in other people’s thoughts.

I’m going to work through the slides and the ideas again but there’s a lot of stuff I want to share with my team.

Huib Schoots‘ talk was about what he believes are the key ingredients of becoming a great GREAT tester: passion, learning, and courage. He emphasized practicing testing and asking feedback for learning purposes. Since Huib challenged the room of testers on knowing the test techniques they use (or rather… the number of them), it made me think of what are the criteria for professionalism in context-driven community. I asked him on Twitter, so now I’m looking for that blog post 🙂 Though I’m thinking now that “heuristics for recognizing professionalism” is a better way of putting it (inspired by “Context-Driven (presentation) heuristics“).

Finally, Henrik Emilsson encouraged us to put names and faces next to stakeholder roles, think of them as people (and the feelings we have towards them), and THEN think of how to communicate the test strategy to that person. The session included to practical exercises which I liked (they focused on writing) but I shall try this out on my own. I gave it my best but I felt I was getting tired already.

One of the most valuable thoughts for me from Henrik’s talk was related to having invested or detached stakeholders. I’m wondering if great test strategy communication could be way to gently “re-attach” stakeholders to projects. And I can see how this goes well with systems thinking when solving problems… So yes, a lot of good stuff to think about for me as I’ve been trying to improve my communication of test results over the past 6 months (still have to blog about it…).

And then I met my testing friends from Twitter and had a great time at a pub solving a testing challenge. There was other stuff but… what happens in Copenhagen, stays in Copenhagen 🙂

See you there next year?